A guide to honey’s color

Did you know that honey isn’t just amber in color?

That’s right, honey comes in a variety of colors, and even has its own grading system! Find out how the color and flavor of honey change depending on the varietal.

How is honey’s color graded?

The United States Department of Agriculture classifies the color of honey into seven categories: water white, extra white, extra light amber, light amber, amber and dark amber. The standard system for measuring the color of honey is called the Pfund color grading system. A Pfund color grader is a standard amber-colored glass wedge that goes from light to dark. Honey is measured on a scale of millimeters, where 0 mm would be on the extreme left of the water white bar and 140 mm is at the extreme right of the dark amber bar.

What makes honey a certain color?

The color of honey depends on the flower source visited by the honey bees. With more than 300 types of honey in the United States, each originating from a different floral source, it’s safe to say that not all honey looks the same.

Does color correlate with the flavor of honey?

Generally, light-colored honeys have a milder taste, while the flavor of darker colored honeys is stronger. However, there are exceptions to the rule. A light honey such as basswood is generally considered strong flavored while the darker tulip poplar is considered mild.

Does the color of honey change?

The color of honey can deepen in color as it ages, and become lighter when it crystallizes. These changes do not affect its flavor.

Did you like this? Share it:
This entry was posted in Honey Technical Information, Marketing Honey in Dairy Products. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.